Climbing Above the Fog

 

Knowing what you want is very important.

It's surprising how many people, even those in leadership roles in large, multi-national organizations and ministries, do know really know what they want. They are good people with good motives and good ideas. They work hard and get a lot done. But, their values are inconsistent; their vision is not clear. They are wandering in the fog.

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To ultimately realize the power of commitment, we must be sure of where we are going and what attitudes and behavior will ensure that we arrive at our destination with our head held high.

Commitment has its origins in clearly perceived values and vision.

Personal Values. I enjoyed reading George W. Bush's book Decision Points. I'm not arguing politics here, but it's obvious to me, after reading the book, that Bush had a set of personal values that were uncompromising and clear. He made decisions from those values. He may have seemed stubborn, but each time he needed to make a decision, he fell back to his personal values. Our values reflect what we feel is important. They are motivators and they give us reasons to do or not to do. If we don't have a set of highly thought out values, we're in a fog when crunch time comes.

Developing a Vision. It's important for a leader to be committed to a vision. Vision is the ability to look beyond today, beyond the obstacles, beyond the majority opinion and gaze across the horizon of time and imagine greater things ahead. It's the ability to see what is not yet reality. It includes foresight as well as insight. Knowing our vision keeps us out of the fog. It keeps us from rattling around and simply punching the time clock.

Leaders who have climbed above the fog know what they are committed to. They have forged values and vision on the anvil of time, experience, hope and faith.

What values drive you? What's your vision?

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One Response to “Climbing Above the Fog”

  1. rob harvey says:

    Did you leave out a “not” in the first sentence? I had to reread it a couple of times to make sure I didn’t miss it.
    FOG: I watched an interesting interview not long about where Tony Blair referred to George Bush’s certitude as a clarifier. It was as if Blair was saying Bush’s values and vision cut through the complexity and made the difficult decisions easier.

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